Now You Can Listen to A Season of Whispers

The audiobook edition of A Season of Whispers is now available at Amazon, on Audible, and at Kobo.

Last summer I had the new-to-me pleasure of listening through audition files of various narrators. My publisher sent me a zip file of mp3s in which potential narrators read a few minutes of the text.

The file I kept returning to was that of Darrin and Kristy Johnson, who took a clever approach to the gig. A Season of Whispers is divided into four acts, two told from a man’s perspective and two told from the perspective of Minerva Grosvenor, the heroine. Darrin narrated the two male acts and Kristy the two Minerva acts, which underscored the switches in POV for the listener.

The pair also threw some voice acting into the mix, with Darrin performing the dialogue of men and Kristy the women regardless of which act they were narrating. As the author I was a little worried how the book’s dialogue would translate to audio because not every line of speech is differentiated by “he said” or “she said” and so on. But by performing the dialogue as if the book was a play, they made the dialogue very easy to follow along.

I knew I’d found my narrators as soon as I heard the Johnsons’ audition. They made this version of the book into something unique, not just a voice reading the text. So glad Aurelia Leo and I can now share the audiobook with listeners.

Blog Tour 2021

To promote the forthcoming release of the audiobook edition of A Season of Whispers, I’m currently in the midst of a six-week blog tour around the internet, which kicked off last Friday with a glowing review by Kirkus Reviews.

Some of the stops are spotlights or brief excerpts but the rest feature original content like interviews and reviews. Some of the highlights:

  • May 7: Read an interview with me at A Life Through Books.
  • May 10: Read a short review at Texas Book Nook: “My main takeaway from this novel is that you get a lot more than you are expecting.”
  • May 14: Read a review at Novel News Network: “Jackson Kuhl has done an amazing job of developing multi dimensional characters.”
  • May 17: Read an interview with me at My Reading Addiction.
  • May 19: Read a review at On a Reading Bender: “a great read that kept me as the reader engrossed.”
  • May 26: Read a review at The Indie Express: “keeps the reader looking around corners and trying to figure out what comes next.”
  • June 7: Read a review at Jazzy Book Reviews: “fascinating, slightly disturbing, and definitely something different from what I was expecting.”
  • June 10: Read an interview with me at The Avid Reader.

An Incident on Mulberry Street

I ended 2020 with a thump like a human heart under the floorboards with a piece of Poe-inspired flash at Love Letters to Poe.

In low tones he explained his process did not involve nerves at all. Years ago, while working with saw and tourniquet in a blood-soaked Union tent, Coffman formed a notion that amputation only removed the physical extremity. What remained, he believed, was an ethereal limb that couldn’t be sliced away with steel.

“An Incident on Mulberry Street” is set in New Haven but you won’t find the address on any modern map. When North Frontage Street was built (the westbound side of Route 34) over what was Fayette Street, Mulberry Street was truncated into a dead end and, somewhat inexplicably, renamed Scranton Street. Meanwhile the streets around it kept their original names. You can see Mulberry Street on this 1893 map of the city, located just above the words “2nd Ward.”

After the story, editor Sara Crocoll Smith posted a short interview with me, which IIRC is my first published interview as a fiction author. There’s also an audio version of the story.

You can read the whole thing here.

A Season of Whispers Bonus Content

A Season of Whispers on an ereader.

Over at Goodreads I’ve posted some free bonus content for A Season of Whispers.

I did an extensive amount of historical research for the book, and while writing it I left a trail of breadcrumbs for myself in the margins. If you’re curious about the context of a certain passage or phrase, now you can read those breadcrumbs for yourself.

Goodreads has a feature in which you can share the notes and highlights made on your Kindle with others. You need to link your Kindle and Goodreads accounts to create the notes but once they’re made public, anyone can read them.

I’ve made a bunch of annotations to A Season of Whispers that explain many of the historical and literary references in the story, which you can read here. Don’t worry if you haven’t read the book yet — spoilers are hidden unless you want to see them.

The notes can also be accessed by scrolling down on the book’s Goodreads page to the section labeled Featured Notes & Highlights.

I don’t believe the notes pop up unannounced on your Kindle. You can only read them through Goodreads. They’re free to access and you don’t need a Goodreads account.

And if you have a question that isn’t answered by the current notes, feel free to reach out. I’ll be adding more notes over time.

A Season of Dinosaur State Park

Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

Connecticut is a geologic hodgepodge. Only the northwestern corner, shown in blue and brown and yellow on the map above, is original to North America. The pink zone on the eastern border and southeastern coast was once part of Africa, while most of the state — the green and ocher areas — was the mud and sediment on the ocean floor between the two continents that was thrown to the surface as the tectonic plates pulled apart. The yellow zone down the middle was a failed rift in Pangaea.

To complicate things, the glaciers of the last ice age stretched from Canada all the way to Long Island Sound, completely blanketing Connecticut and terminating in the berm of rocks we now call Long Island. As they receded, the glaciers left the boulders and stones they had pushed before them, which makes Connecticut soil so notoriously difficult to farm.

The yellow division on the map, called the Newark terrane, is chock full of fossils and dinosaur tracks. At the Dinosaur State Park in Rocky Hill, you can see hundreds of three-toed footprints left by Dilophosaurus, pictured here, or at least a theropod dinosaur very similar to her.

Dilophosaurus wetherilli, CC Heather Kyoht Luterman

The tracks — which crisscross each other, running hither and yon — were discovered on the site in 1968 during construction of a building. Those plans were scrapped and a geodesic dome was built over the spot, where visitors today can admire the tracks from raised walkways. Amazingly, what’s visible is a fraction of the total as scientists left several thousand more tracks buried for preservation’s sake.

A Season of Whispers

I’ve always associated dinosaurs and fossils with the southwest and the northern plains, so I was surprised when I discovered Dinosaur State Park less than an hour from our house. I haven’t been there in years but once upon a time it was a perfect day trip for our pair of dinosaur-obsessed boys, and our visits left, well, an impression on me.

This geologic history is a gold mine for a writer of Gothic fiction. After all, the overriding conceit of the genre is that the past haunts the present — and who’s to say if something from antediluvian epochs, thought long dead and gone, might not whisper in our ears tonight?

I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s tour through some of the settings and places that influenced my novel A Season of Whispers, which is now available in various ebook formats and as a trade paperback. Thanks for reading!